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Watercolor

<- Visual Arts

AcuarelaSuch a technique of painting is most practical on paper, cardboard or paperboard; it is characterized by the transparency of the colors that are diluted with water.

The watercolor technique is applied by diluting water agglutinated with the pigment by a soft rubber, such as Arabic. The transparency of the colors depends on how much water will be incorporated into the rubber and also to the tone that is required by the painter.

This technique does not use white because it is obtained by the transparency effect between the paint and white paper. The goal of the watercolor is transparent colors with water and perhaps even allowing the paper or cardboards texture to add another tone or depth to the painting.

The watercolor is composed of glue pigments with gum Arabic; it is a naturally occurring carbohydrate, extracted from the resin of trees in the sub-Saharan area, this amber resin is normally collected by hand once it is dry or honey like.

History

The watercolor technique arose with the invention of paper in China, where watercolors were used to decorate silk and rice paper. It wasn't until the eighteenth century that it was introduced to Spain by the Moors and was extended to Italy a few decades later.

The creation of the art of oil painting had an impact on the interest in Fresco or watercolor painting. Watercolor caused painting to shift to a second level, allowing the creation of preliminary sketches or using it for a subject of study.

The watercolor has its predecessor with Fresco in Europe. The Fresco is indeed a special watercolor used to paint the walls in wet plaster; the Sistine Chapel is a vivid example of Fresco. In Europe the first data that is related to the watercolor is by the Italian painter Raffaello Santi, his paintings on large sketches of tapestries.

In Germany the first school of watercolor was given by Hans Bol, he was influenced by the works of Albrecht Dürer who painted watercolors in the early fifteenth century 1471. The real breakthrough was in England in the eighteenth century, technological advances that improved the quality and production of paper and the pigments used to paint watercolors.

Since the revolution in watercolor, France also had exponents that were very important and it was not the only country to. The watercolor technique nearly perfected the technique of oil painting and became the favorite for British, European and American painters when used as a "simpler" technique for the transmission of their perceptions.

Watercolor painting came to a point of comparison with the oil painting in range of expression and prestige; these breakthroughs were due to the Americans.

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